Login   Register     FAQ    Members

View unanswered posts   View active topics


Board index .:|:. Slogging at Lessons :: Books .:|:. Special Sixth
It is currently 21 Oct 2018, 16:42

Forum rules


Please ensure that all posts are kept impersonal. Any posts involving an ad hominem attack will be edited or deleted. Please feel free to express your views, but expect that others may disagree with them. Please limit the use of the :oops: smiley as far as possible. Please do not PM another user to argue with them; if this happens, please can the recipient contact a mod. Language of gentlemen, chaps!



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 117 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 10 Aug 2018, 08:54 
Offline
Order Mark!
Order Mark!
User avatar

Joined: 03 May 2008, 15:51
Posts: 184
Location: London
Joyce wrote:
Maybe it's a cultural thing? My parents are very Chinese so saving face is a massive deal with them and I was given very strict guidelines on what I could or could not accept as gifts when I was a child. An ice cream is OK. An entire lunch is not. If I told my mother that my friend's mother had given me money for an outing I would have had to return it. The assumption I was given was that my parents give me enough pocket money and I was only ever allowed to ask my parents for more money. If I had been in Richenda's position I would have been taught to thank Joey politely but explain my parents would not allow me to accept.


I'm from the north of England. I would have refused as well. Just not the done thing. It may be an age thing?

_________________
"Lack of planning on your part does not necessarily mean an emergency on mine"

"Association does not infer causality"


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 10 Aug 2018, 09:14 
Offline
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
User avatar

Joined: 15 Oct 2004, 13:57
Posts: 7899
Location: Manchester
I'm also from the North of England :D . I can't imagine a friend's parent ever actually offering to give me money. I'd have been the age that Richenda is in this book in the late '80s'/early '90s, but I don't think things have changed since then. If I'd been going out for the day with a friend's family, as opposed to just going round to their house, my mum and dad would have made sure that I'd taken an appropriate amount of money with me. But this is a weird situation because Prof Fry has stopped Richenda's pocket money, so she hasn't actually got any money of her own - I assume that the little she had would have gone on essentials and church collections.

I don't know what the answer is - it would have been very awkward if they'd all gone into a cafe and the triplets had each bought a cake and Ricki had had to sit there and watch them eat!

_________________
We really must stop eating like this ...

Minds are like parachutes - they only function when open.

http://setinthepast.wordpress.com/




Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 10 Aug 2018, 16:14 
Offline
Stumped by Lower Four's quiz
Stumped by Lower Four's quiz
User avatar

Joined: 27 May 2006, 13:28
Posts: 998
Location: SE England
Quote:
As for whether Joey should have given Ricki a fun time?

It's more just having her fit in with whatever the triplets were doing, isn't it? Anything else would have been extra trouble for Jo. She was having Richenda as a favour when she'd probably have preferred not to have a guest. School couldn't expect then to impose conditions which would have caused inconvenience for the household - meals and supervision needed if she stayed at home when the triplets went out, for example.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 10 Aug 2018, 18:09 
Offline
Lamenting the amount of work
Lamenting the amount of work
User avatar

Joined: 13 Aug 2009, 18:41
Posts: 2930
Location: Czech Republic and Herts UK
I suspect Joyce is right, and there are some cultural influences at play here.

My mother was Czech, and it took a while for me to learn when I started to live over here, that it is almost unheard of to visit friends with small children and not bring them some sort of gift, usually sweets.

I would normally bring presents to those children that I already knew, but not go armed with sweets when visiting people I had not met before, particularly since I might have had no clue that they had any children.

I get the impression that often older Czech women automatically make sure they have sweets in their bags all the time!

I suspect my mother's way of doing things was not the norm in Britain. But then most of what she did, was not the norm in Britain :D

_________________
Cestina's dolls houses - Bringing Ospreys to Bavorov


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 11 Aug 2018, 05:15 
Offline
Dashing off for your part in the play
Dashing off for your part in the play

Joined: 30 Jan 2004, 00:07
Posts: 1005
Location: Taiwan
As an adolescent, it would have been normal for a friend's parent to offer to treat for food or admission to an event, if we were out somewhere, but it would have been unusual for them to actually buy stuff for me, and unheard of to give me spending money.

I can see the school's problem. The options for half term are to go on the school trip, or for the parent to make other arrangements (picking up the kid, or giving permission for them to go with friends). Professor Fry demands that the school remain open and staffed for the half term, so that they can supervise Richenda and punish her, and the school naturally says no. If he had hired a babysitter from an agency to look after Richenda during the break, during which she sat in a hotel room and wrote lines, the school would have had to go along with that.

From a school management perspective, the appropriate thing to do would have been to inform Professor Fry (by telegram if necessary), that if he hadn't made other plans for Richenda by the half-term, she would go on the trip, and that he was welcome to remove her from the school, forfeiting the term's fees, if he wasn't willing to follow school policies.

Of course, dumping Richenda on the Maynards, who weren't school staff, without Professor Fry's permission, was not appropriate. Once they did that, slipping her spending money was pretty minor.

_________________


Ring the bells that still can ring; Forget your perfect offering
There is a crack in everything; That's how the light gets in
Anthem: Leonard Cohen



Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 11 Aug 2018, 13:22 
Offline
Receiving support from the form
Receiving support from the form
User avatar

Joined: 23 Sep 2004, 21:57
Posts: 655
Location: UP NORTH
I would have thought the money given to Richenda would have been a 'tip' - gift of cash usually given to children by family friends or relatives but in this case by Jo who is standing in for parents. Jacynth is given a ten shilling note on her way to school in 'Gay.' It's kind and should be accepted in the spirit in which it is given. I often 'tip' young relatives as I do not always know what gifts they would like.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 12 Aug 2018, 02:17 
Offline
Swept off by Matey to pack
Swept off by Matey to pack

Joined: 19 Sep 2011, 22:32
Posts: 1105
When we were children, aunts and uncles and most guests on a formal visit would bring us sweets or maybe give us money and obviously my mother did the same with their children.

A grandmother who visited each Tuesday evening for her tea took us sweets and saving stamps.

Although Joey gave Richenda money, I seem to remember that in Reunion Grizel offered Len money to buy something she wanted - a present for her mother maybe? - but Len refused saying she was not allowed to accept money. A shopkeeper also offered to let her take the ornament with her, saying she knew Len would get the money to her, but again Len refused.

I don't have Reunion to hand but if what I have said is not correct it is close. It does seem therefore that Joey was employing double standards although the difference was that Len would get money from her own family whereas Richenda would not.

Again, I don't have the book to hand but I am fairly certain that in Wins the Trick she helps the Everetts out financially at the school sale.

Does anybody find, from an adult POV, that it can sometimes cause upset to refuse the offer of something and, provided the gift is not too expensive, it can be good manners to accept?


Last edited by Audrey25 on 12 Aug 2018, 03:40, edited 1 time in total.

Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 12 Aug 2018, 03:39 
Offline
Dashing off for your part in the play
Dashing off for your part in the play

Joined: 30 Jan 2004, 00:07
Posts: 1005
Location: Taiwan
It is pretty dodgy in Richenda when you think about it - Professor Fry has cut Richenda's pocket money to a minimum as a punishment, and Joey is deliberately going behind his back to circumvent it. And as Audrey25 said, Joey's kids aren't even allowed to borrow money from an honorary aunt for a couple of hours.

If someone did that when it was Joey's punishment, or the school's, it would be a major deal involving further punishment and lectures about being sneaky and untrustworthy. In Tom, going to the bank to get your own money when Matey has stopped your pocket money was met with a response of being hauled up by Matey, who "said-oh, disgusting things about lack of honour, and going behind her back." And that's for your own money!

_________________


Ring the bells that still can ring; Forget your perfect offering
There is a crack in everything; That's how the light gets in
Anthem: Leonard Cohen



Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 12 Aug 2018, 08:28 
Offline
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
User avatar

Joined: 15 Oct 2004, 13:57
Posts: 7899
Location: Manchester
In Gone With The Wind, there's a whole set of unwritten rules about gifts that unmarried girls are and aren't allowed to accept from would-be suitors. Sweets, chocolates and flowers are OK. Any item of clothing is not OK, even if you are actually engaged. A bottle of perfume is borderline. It's one of those areas where unwritten rules can be very complicated.

I think people are generally uneasy about money rather than presents. These days, when most couples set up home together before marriage, the traditional wedding gifts of household items aren't really appropriate, so a lot of people would rather have money, but old habits die hard and people aren't always comfortable about giving money. But that's obviously a cultural thing because we see in Head Girl that Marie and Andreas's guests give money rather than "things", and that someone writes down how much each person has given. Mary Burnett is horrified, because that just wouldn't be done in an English-speaking country - the idea that there's something vulgar about money still persists!

It must be a Victorian thing. Mrs Bennet, Mrs Phillips, Lady Lucas & co chat away merrily about Mr Bingley and Mr Darcy's annual income, but that would have been considered incredibly rude 100 years later, or even now.

"Tips" from family members of an older generation, and godparents, seem to be OK, and maybe very close family friends would count too. In whichever EJO book it is where Roddy Kane finds out that Rosamund is his half-sister, not his mother, and therefore her other kids are his nieces and nephews, there's a joke about how uncles have to tip their nieces and nephews. And kids in the Naughtiest Girl books are always receiving postal orders from uncles or aunts or godparents! But Ricki and Joey have only known each other a few weeks.

_________________
We really must stop eating like this ...

Minds are like parachutes - they only function when open.

http://setinthepast.wordpress.com/




Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 12 Aug 2018, 11:56 
Offline
Receiving support from the form
Receiving support from the form
User avatar

Joined: 25 Feb 2007, 15:45
Posts: 653
Location: Australia
Alison H wrote:
In Gone With The Wind, there's a whole set of unwritten rules about gifts that unmarried girls are and aren't allowed to accept from would-be suitors. Sweets, chocolates and flowers are OK. Any item of clothing is not OK, even if you are actually engaged. A bottle of perfume is borderline.


Those rules were actually quite close to what I was raised to think, so when I started going out with guys that way of thinking still stuck around.

I accepted flowers, chocolates, dinners, movie tickets, but anything more expensive would be politely turned down unless we were serious. And even then I only accepted expensive presents on birthdays or Christmas, because I could reciprocate in kind with a gift.

Audrey25 wrote:
Again, I don't have the book to hand but I am fairly certain that in Wins the Trick she helps the Everetts out financially at the school sale.


It's not Joey in WTT but Con who sees that Audrey can't afford to join in the new game of guessing Bruno's weight and she 'treats' her to start the game off. It's actually a lovely tactful move from 'tactless' Con!

Mel wrote:
I would have thought the money given to Richenda would have been a 'tip' - gift of cash usually given to children by family friends or relatives but in this case by Jo who is standing in for parents. Jacynth is given a ten shilling note on her way to school in 'Gay.'


In Jacynth's case the tip is from an old family friend, whereas Ricki barely knows Joey. And her father doesn't know them at all.

And giving Jacyth a tip as she leaves for school is a tactful way of saying "I know your aunt wouldn't have much to give you, so this is from us". It could also be construed as a farewell gift.

Whereas Joey's gift cannot be seen as anything other than straight out giving Ricki money. From Ricki's POV, Joey is making sure Ricki is not put in the awkward position of having to explain why she has no cash. But we are never told what Pro Fry would have thought about it.

And Pro Fry hadn't actually stopped Ricki's pocket money, he just kept it minimal and she was too proud to ask for more.

Audrey25 wrote:
Does anybody find, from an adult POV, that it can sometimes cause upset to refuse the offer of something and, provided the gift is not too expensive, it can be good manners to accept?


Yes! When I first returned to Australia, I didn't have a job so when I went out with friends/relatives they would always say "oh, let us pay for you."

I was quite embarrassed. The old childhood thinking kicked in and I could hear my mum's voice in my head. But I finally realised they meant it as a kind gesture and when I got a job and had cash in hand, I made sure to return the gesture and treat them.

_________________
It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how - Dr Seuss


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 12 Aug 2018, 13:16 
Offline
Getting all your textbooks for lessons

Joined: 20 Nov 2014, 13:07
Posts: 82
The cultural difference can been seen in the north of Scotland. My mother was from the Hebrides and it is still common for children to be given a 'tip'; my daughter always loved this part of our holidays! When my parents were married up there in 1962 they were given cash as gifts by all the Scottish guests; they blew the lot on a honeymoon in France!


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 12 Aug 2018, 14:28 
Offline
Discovering that JMB lives next door
Discovering that JMB lives next door
User avatar

Joined: 21 May 2012, 14:59
Posts: 123
Joyce wrote:
mynameisdumbnuts wrote:
I think one of adult Joey's nicest moments is when she gives Ricki her envelope of half-term money.


I agree it was a nice thing for Joey to do because it shows she's treating Ricki like one of her own daughters.

But my parents would be most unhappy if a friend's parents gave me spending money at that age because they would feel obligated to return the favour. And they would feel they had lost face as in "does that mother think I can't afford to give my child spending money?"

What do other parents feel? Would you be upset if a friend's parents gave your child spending money? Or would you simply regard it as a friendly gesture with no obligation attached?

I think my mum would have thought it was very kind and generous. I doubt she'd have felt "oh no, we owe them," or been offended. And Richenda did buy Joey a lovely present as a thank you.

When you mentioned losing face, I was going to ask you if you were Chinese, but you answered that question downthread.
Miriam wrote:
First of all, I don't think Professor Fry was ever intended to know that Joey gave Richenda spending money (and quite possibly never did).

Secondly, I don't think that the money was the important thing here. She wanted to put Richenda on a level with her daughters (and the rest of the form) in that she was able to spend some money on herself and presents for others during half-term. Richenda had recieved minimal pocket money during the term, and nothing extra for half term, as many of the girls did. For Richenda to have been going out with the triplets and watching them spending money without too much concern would only have increased Richenda's resentment against her father, and Joey's aim at this point was to overcome at least some of that resentment and encourage tham to have a better relationship. The money (and it probably wasn't even very much) was part of that strategy.

This, all of it. I assumed Joey was doing it behind his back.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 12 Aug 2018, 15:01 
Offline
Indulging in a midnight feast
Indulging in a midnight feast
User avatar

Joined: 21 Oct 2004, 08:41
Posts: 535
Location: Manchester
I think, as readers, we are supposed to think that, while Richenda’s behaviour has been wrong, her father’s attitude is really wrong, and unfair to her, and unreasonably over harsh.

So, Joey’s whole approach with that half term is trying to mitigate against this - not run the professor down in front of Richenda, but trying to ensure that Richenda has a normal half term experience, isn’t further embittered and bonds enough with the Maynards to feel that she has friends at the school / someone to turn to. And at least starts the journey to understanding her father a little.

So, in that context, I don’t think the money is a big deal. It’s part of the whole picture of ensuring Richenda is on a par with the others. Joey is acting in loco parentis, I guess, rather than just as “school friend’s mum”.

It is very much of a one-off, though. Other such “tips” are given from relatives or brevet relatives or people who already have a strong bond.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 12 Aug 2018, 16:52 
Offline
Having Miss Annersley for Civics
Having Miss Annersley for Civics
User avatar

Joined: 21 Jul 2012, 16:53
Posts: 3225
Location: West London Alps
Thank you, Caroline - that sums up my feelings to a T.

Audrey25 wrote:
Although Joey gave Richenda money, I seem to remember that in Reunion Grizel offered Len money to buy something she wanted - a present for her mother maybe? - but Len refused saying she was not allowed to accept money. A shopkeeper also offered to let her take the ornament with her, saying she knew Len would get the money to her, but again Len refused.

I don't have Reunion to hand but if what I have said is not correct it is close. It does seem therefore that Joey was employing double standards although the difference was that Len would get money from her own family whereas Richenda would not.
I did check this - the crucial difference is that Grizel was offering to lend Len the money to buy a carving for herself, and the shopkeeper was offering to let her take it and owe him the money. You can see why neither was acceptable, if maybe a little idealistic by current standards - what was OK was the shopkeeper's next offer of putting the item aside for Len, and she voluntarily left him a deposit.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 12 Aug 2018, 18:00 
Offline
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
Rescuing a Junior from the lake
User avatar

Joined: 15 Oct 2004, 13:57
Posts: 7899
Location: Manchester
Buying things on tick was the start of the slippery slope to rack and ruin :lol: :lol: :lol: . Only the raffish aristocracy, who left poor tradesmen waiting weeks for money, caddish types like Captain Carrick and Mr Wickham, who didn't pay at all, and very rough people would do such a thing (Lorna Hill goes on repeatedly about how the Sordy family bought their TV on the never never, which none of the author-approved characters would have dreamt of doing). Perish the thought that Len should buy anything on credit :lol: .

When my mum and dad got married, 50 years ago, they bought a washing machine on hire purchase, and my grandad was horrified! As far as a lot of people of his age were concerned, if they couldn't afford to buy one outright, they should manage without until they'd saved up enough to do so - and I suppose that was where Len was coming from.

_________________
We really must stop eating like this ...

Minds are like parachutes - they only function when open.

http://setinthepast.wordpress.com/




Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 12 Aug 2018, 23:48 
Offline
Swept off by Matey to pack
Swept off by Matey to pack

Joined: 19 Sep 2011, 22:32
Posts: 1105
Noreen wrote:
Thank you, Caroline - that sums up my feelings to a T.

Audrey25 wrote:
Although Joey gave Richenda money, I seem to remember that in Reunion Grizel offered Len money to buy something she wanted - a present for her mother maybe? - but Len refused saying she was not allowed to accept money. A shopkeeper also offered to let her take the ornament with her, saying she knew Len would get the money to her, but again Len refused.

I don't have Reunion to hand but if what I have said is not correct it is close. It does seem therefore that Joey was employing double standards although the difference was that Len would get money from her own family whereas Richenda would not.
I did check this - the crucial difference is that Grizel was offering to lend Len the money to buy a carving for herself, and the shopkeeper was offering to let her take it and owe him the money. You can see why neither was acceptable, if maybe a little idealistic by current standards - what was OK was the shopkeeper's next offer of putting the item aside for Len, and she voluntarily left him a deposit.


I can understand Len not wanting to take the article from the shopkeeper when it was not fully paid for. Surely it was better though that she was going to repay the money to Grizel? I am assuming she would have done this immediately after she returned home?

On the other hand, a line must be drawn somewhere. The Maynards quite rightly would not want their children to be obligated to anyone, with all the remote, but still possible, nasty implications that could result from this.

The same applies though from Richenda being obligated to the Maynards. Joey was doing good but such a situation as Richenda being sent to someone unknown to her family would hopefully never, ever arise nowadays.

Edited to add - I actually think this is still double standards. I don't for one second think that Len would have accepted money from Grizel, or anyone else , without parental approval.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 13 Aug 2018, 08:45 
Offline
Dashing off for your part in the play
Dashing off for your part in the play

Joined: 30 Jan 2004, 00:07
Posts: 1005
Location: Taiwan
Alison H wrote:
But that's obviously a cultural thing because we see in Head Girl that Marie and Andreas's guests give money rather than "things", and that someone writes down how much each person has given.


Chinese weddings are very cash oriented - you show up at the wedding with your 紅包 (red envelope), and hand it over at the appropriate table, where you sign the guest book.

Quote:
It must be a Victorian thing. Mrs Bennet, Mrs Phillips, Lady Lucas & co chat away merrily about Mr Bingley and Mr Darcy's annual income, but that would have been considered incredibly rude 100 years later, or even now.


I got the impression it was pretty rude back then, too. The "5000 a year" conversation would now be gossip about someone being a dot com millionaire and what their net worth was.

_________________


Ring the bells that still can ring; Forget your perfect offering
There is a crack in everything; That's how the light gets in
Anthem: Leonard Cohen



Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 13 Aug 2018, 10:12 
Offline
Receiving support from the form
Receiving support from the form
User avatar

Joined: 23 Sep 2004, 21:57
Posts: 655
Location: UP NORTH
I get the impression that the Maynard home rules are crazily rigid. Think of Len in Future where she does not borrow toothpaste from one of her sisters. It always does seem to be Len who has these moral dilemmas, we never get any of this when Jo was growing up. It's possibly EBD doing a bit of tub-thumping about the decadence of modern non-Joey - trained teenagers.


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 13 Aug 2018, 16:56 
Offline
Sharing a joke with the doctor
Sharing a joke with the doctor
User avatar

Joined: 08 Feb 2005, 15:50
Posts: 2369
Location: Cheshire
Having been a child, and also had a child, I can't see what the problem is with Richenda being handed the envelope by Jo. It was a gentle, considerate thing to do for a girl who was really being treated quite harshly by her father and deserved some compassion. It wasn't the school doing it, but Jo as an independent mum with children of her own and couldn't bear that one child should be left out.

I bought things occasionally for my daughter's friends when they came out with us, and her friends' parents - not necessarily the same friends - often did the same. No one seemed bothered by it and no one felt the need to 'repay' it.




Ooops! :oops: Just realised I posted this after finishing the page before, and not going on to read the comments on this page. Put it down to the horrid bug that laid me low the last 8 days! Not with it yet! *sighs*

_________________
"It takes a long time to live what you learn." May Sarton


Top | End
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Books: The Chalet School and Richenda
PostPosted: 13 Aug 2018, 17:12 
Offline
Attending the Fifth Form Evening
Attending the Fifth Form Evening
User avatar

Joined: 04 Jan 2012, 06:47
Posts: 326
Location: North Carolina, USA
Jo can justify giving Ricki the money by saying that to do otherwise would be to punish her own daughters. I'm sure the Triplets would have felt uncomfortable spending cash and treating themselves in front of someone who couldn't participate. That's not fair to them.

I don't see a double standard here. If Len borrows money from Grizel or owes a shop for a trinket, that's a conscious decision on her part. Ricki, however, has no agency here. She made zero decisions that led her to her predicament; it's not her fault she can't go home or stay at school. She has to do whatever the closest authority figures tell her to do, and that's go to the Maynards.

The root cause of all this is that Professor Fry believes he can use outsiders to punish Ricki when in reality he has no say. The school isn't obligated to help him fulfill his punishment. Neither are the Maynards, by unwitting extension. They are doing Professor Fry a massive favour by making sure his child is in a safe environment with responsible grown-ups looking after her health and welfare.

Mel wrote:
I get the impression that the Maynard home rules are crazily rigid. Think of Len in Future where she does not borrow toothpaste from one of her sisters.


I can sort of see why there are these rules. It would be pretty chaotic to have a dozen kids and wards borrowing each other's stuff (with or without permission) and likely complaining to Jo about one another using the last of their toothpaste/soap/whatever. Far easier to forbid borrowing and make each child responsible for their own stuff, right? Although given Len's age and obvious responsible character, it's a bit mad if she couldn't borrow some toothpaste from her doubtlessly obliging sisters. And she shouldn't have to use her own money to buy toothpaste; her parents should be providing it.

_________________
"I -- I didn't think!" -- Carola Johnstone


Top | End
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 117 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next

Board index .:|:. Slogging at Lessons :: Books .:|:. Special Sixth
It is currently 21 Oct 2018, 16:42

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group