Food at the CS (archive)
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#1: Food at the CS (archive) Author: KatarzynaLocation: North West England PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 11:00 am


Ok, whilst we all know that the CS diet of featherbeds of whipped cream and other such luxuries wouldn't actually have done much for the health of the girls I was wondering what foods they are mentioned as eating.

I know EBD did try to use local dishes and during the war books when rationing was in force she tried to show this but what else did they eat

Examples of breakfasts, lunches and Dinners if you can recall them please!

 


#2:  Author: RroseSelavyLocation: Oxford, UK PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 12:12 pm


I seem to remember cereals or porridge being metioned for breakfast in the Armishire books. And fruit and custard for pudding.

 


#3:  Author: KBLocation: Melbourne, Australia PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 12:58 pm


Kate, do you get the FOCS annual? The one for 2004 has a quiz that lists all sorts of meals enjoyed by CS girls. I suggest you check that out.

 


#4:  Author: NellLocation: London, England PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 1:07 pm


Kathie Ferrars first meal in new Mistress (guess what my lunchtime reading was) consisted of creamy soup sprinkled with herbs, followed by veal in a picquant sauce and then a huge hollow bun stuffed with jam and cream...and that was just for lunch!

 


#5:  Author: SusanLocation: Carlisle PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 1:36 pm


Rolls, honey and fruit in the early books for breakfast. With milk or milky coffee to drink.

Trying hard to remember with no books to hand and all I can see is the meal where they had soup with sausages in and somewhere they had cherries dipped in alcohol.

 


#6:  Author: Alison HLocation: Manchester PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 1:45 pm


They seemed to have a lot of kalbsbraten (stuffed veal), and (not that it's a local delicacy of anywhere in particular!) they always seemd to have meat pies on picnics. Coffee and rolls for breakfast, and the rolls were always cold unless it was half term! & some of the "foreign" girls broke the rolls up into the coffee. & the butter was sometimes yellow and sometimes ivory-coloured! Lots of milk, especially hot milk (ugh) if people'd fallen in lakes/got stuck in snowstorms/woken up in the night. I think it was usually cold meats, because that's what Ricki Fry was told when she asked if they'd be having sauerkraut because it was the only food she could think of. & potato balls. & it was always delicious! You don't seem to've got any choice so it must've been hard luck if you were a fussy eater!

 


#7:  Author: PatLocation: Doncaster PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 1:50 pm


I think that EBD was very fond of veal. They seem to have it an awful lot.

 


#8:  Author: MiaLocation: London PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 2:16 pm


They also had Karen's delicious vegetable stews (is it in Mary-Lou when they have The Great Famine and food can't be delivered to the Platz?) and lots of milky or jam type puddings. Oh and great ornamental salads in summer, as in Wins the Trick with Karen's 'special' lemonade.

 


#9:  Author: claireLocation: South Wales PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 4:59 pm


(dried) scrambled eggs - breakfast in Lavender (I think)
Fish 'mush' in one of the Tirol books (after Joey's cooking lesson)
Doughnuts for tea in Carola (and fish and chips for lunch (I think) in the same book)

 


#10:  Author: KBLocation: Melbourne, Australia PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 9:53 pm


Pat wrote:
I think that EBD was very fond of veal. They seem to have it an awful lot.


I think it be more likely to have been an availability issue - there always seemed to be cows around when the CS was in mountainous areas, and as male calves would be no use to farmers who wanted milkers for cheese, cream and milk, it would be better to slaughter the bull calves and sell them for meat.

 


#11:  Author: tiffinataLocation: melbourne, australia PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 9:58 pm


Also vegetable sausages, of which the recipe was only known to Karen.

Apfeltorte
Bricelets
slices of beef in a sauce, carrots and potatos in a gravy (two sams)

 


#12:  Author: aitchemelleLocation: West Sussex PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 10:42 pm


tiffinata wrote:
Also vegetable sausages, of which the recipe was only known to Karen.

Apfeltorte
Bricelets
slices of beef in a sauce, carrots and potatos in a gravy (two sams)


I'm sur eI should know but bricelets?? what are they?

ETA: roast beef with potatoes, red cabbage and apricots << in Eustacia - Pat's drabble but hey I contributed!!

 


#13:  Author: KBLocation: Melbourne, Australia PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2005 1:39 am


aitchemelle wrote:
I'm sur eI should know but bricelets?? what are they?


A square of sweet wafer fried in olive oil.

 


#14:  Author: Kathy_SLocation: midwestern US PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2005 2:27 am


KB wrote:
aitchemelle wrote:
I'm sur eI should know but bricelets?? what are they?

A square of sweet wafer fried in olive oil.

Unfortunately, I don't know what sweet wafer is, either. "Wafer" in my experience either refers to "Vanilla Wafers" (a brand of cookie) or Communion wafers. I can't really imagine frying either, though in the 60s Vanilla Wafers were popular in pseudo-pie-crusts and such....

 


#15:  Author: KBLocation: Melbourne, Australia PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2005 3:24 am


Googling 'bricelet' and doing a little translating gets the word 'waffle'. This is what one website had to say on the subject:

Le bricelet est une petite gaufre trs mince, croustillante et friable, plate ou roule en flte. Traditionnellement, on le confectionne la maison, pour les ftes, mais de nos jours ils sont disponibles tout au long de l'anne dans les commerces.

(The bricelet is a small waffle, very slim, crispy and friable, flat or rolled in flute. Traditionally, they are made at home, for holidays, but at present they are available throughout the year in trade.)

 


#16:  Author: LizBLocation: Oxon, England PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2005 8:48 am


Now you've got me thinking of brandy snaps, which is probably completely the wrong thing Wink

Liz

 


#17:  Author: francesnLocation: away with the faeries PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2005 11:33 am


similar to brandy snaps, Liz - just without the brandy!

 


#18:  Author: MiriamLocation: Jerusalem, Israel PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2005 10:05 pm


Rissotto for Nina's first meal. And don't forget the genaral favourite apfelstrudel.

Polly Winterton was very unhappy with a meal of boiled beef (pot roast?) followed by milk pudding on one occasion.

Something 'pink and craemy and smelling of strawberrries' seemed to be requisite for most parties.

 


#19:  Author: LianeLocation: Manchester PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2005 10:20 pm


I am probably wrong but fruit only seems prominent when buying apples from Greta or on picnics. Bowls of bread and milk for when you have toothache. (How disgusting does that sound!)

 


#20:  Author: Kate (as guest) PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2005 6:15 pm


This might be a silly question, but when EBD says veal, does she mean actual veal (as in baby calf) or does she mean it in a continental sense (as in beef)?

The idea of people eating baby calves makes me queasy, so I always imagine it to just be beef, as they always say veal when they mean beef/steak in Spain and Portugal.

 


#21:  Author: joelleLocation: lancashire, england PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2005 8:23 pm


in addrienne (sp?) they have a meal with 4/5 different ways-of-cooked potatoes. have probably got the grammar wrong there, sorry. cant imagine that.
they have strawberries and cream sometimes dont they?because pepper was put on it i think in wins the trick.and salad.
pastries described as light but rich "as only austrian pastries can" addrienne again.

 


#22:  Author: JennieLocation: Cambridgeshire PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2005 10:55 am


They always took baskets of fruit with them on their famous picnics.

 


#23:  Author: joelleLocation: lancashire, england PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2005 8:32 pm


just read wins the trick it was gooseberries not strawberries.

 


#24:  Author: LianeLocation: Manchester PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2005 10:22 pm


In 'Mary-Lou they have yeast dumplings in a plum sauce. Can't remember the name though (something mit Pflaume)

 


#25:  Author: Miss DiLocation: Newcastle, NSW PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2005 5:25 am


Do you think the potato balls are noisy Englishmen (Pommes Noisettes) or dumplings?

Also, why is beef OK and veal not? It's all dead cow meat! (Yum yum)

Other food that springs to mind - Raw Bacon (CS and the Lintons).

 


#26:  Author: tiffinataLocation: melbourne, australia PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 2005 4:27 am


Good question Miss Di.


Whatever happened to the Maggii 'Pomme noisettes' that were available in the frozen food section of the supermarket?
Haven't seen them for a while
They were like mashed potato balls fried crispy. (yummy)
Maybe I should try another supermarket.

And it's good to see Mars bars back on sale in NSW!!



Andrea

 


#27:  Author: KateLocation: Ireland PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 2005 3:34 pm


Miss Di wrote:
Also, why is beef OK and veal not? It's all dead cow meat! (Yum yum)


Veal is babies... and the calves treated dreadfully, aren't they? They're stuck in boxes and not allowed move. Sad

Anyway, I'm repulsed by both, really, but veal is much worse.

 


#28:  Author: JennieLocation: Cambridgeshire PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 2005 3:53 pm


And the calves aren't allowed to suckle from their mothers after the first couple of times.

 


#29:  Author: Miss DiLocation: Newcastle, NSW PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2005 4:04 am


Aha, I see. Clearly another case of same words different language! Here (in Oz), veal is young beef. There is no "white veal" production in Australia. The rules are at http://www.affa.gov.au/content/output.cfm?ObjectID=D2C48F86-BA1A-11A1-A2200060B0A00795

And I personally believe that baby or adult, it is still meat and I'm not a vegetarian. As long as it is reared and killed humanely and is not an endangered species, I'm happy. We actually eat more Skippy than any other meat.

Tffinata, I too wish Magi would bring back their froz. noisy englishmen! I bought a Mars bar today in joy of seeing their return Laughing

 


#30:  Author: RisnLocation: Vancouver for now PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2005 8:38 am


I didn't know people ate kangaroo! *blinks in her unworldliness*

 


#31:  Author: LulieLocation: Middlesbrough PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2005 10:54 am


A lot of the Baby Maynards seem to get "a boiled egg broken over breadcrumbs" for their supper. Personally I think that sounds the most revolting way of eating eggs! I have a vision of a bowlful of breadcumbs with nasty rubbery hard boiled egg bits scattered all over the top <yuk>

 


#32:  Author: SusanLocation: Carlisle PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2005 11:03 am


Lulie wrote:
A lot of the Baby Maynards seem to get "a boiled egg broken over breadcrumbs" for their supper. Personally I think that sounds the most revolting way of eating eggs! I have a vision of a bowlful of breadcumbs with nasty rubbery hard boiled egg bits scattered all over the top <yuk>


I always picture it as a very soft, runny boiled egg which sounds just as revolting.

 


#33:  Author: RisnLocation: Vancouver for now PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2005 11:44 am


Breadcrumbs were the staple of a ton of meals at that time - they talk about them a lot in the Cookbook.

 


#34:  Author: Kathy_SLocation: midwestern US PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2005 1:55 pm


Susan wrote:
Lulie wrote:
A lot of the Baby Maynards seem to get "a boiled egg broken over breadcrumbs" for their supper. Personally I think that sounds the most revolting way of eating eggs! I have a vision of a bowlful of breadcumbs with nasty rubbery hard boiled egg bits scattered all over the top <yuk>

I always picture it as a very soft, runny boiled egg which sounds just as revolting.

This was the normal way of eating soft-boiled eggs for us, depending on the definition of bread crumbs. We broke up bread into easily spooned up pieces. Next, we (or Mommy at that age) scooped the eggs out of their shells onto the bread, added butter and salt, and mixed a little. No such thing as egg cups! When not feeling terribly well, I still think of this as a comfort food -- though I don't leave the yolk quite as runny due to Salmonella brainwashing.

Bread-and-milk also happened, though not frequently, as it was considered less healthy than cereal. Break up bread, sugar it a bit, pour on milk, and eat.

 


#35:  Author: LulieLocation: Middlesbrough PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2005 3:55 pm


Kathy_S wrote:

This was the normal way of eating soft-boiled eggs for us, depending on the definition of bread crumbs. We broke up bread into easily spooned up pieces. Next, we (or Mommy at that age) scooped the eggs out of their shells onto the bread, added butter and salt, and mixed a little. No such thing as egg cups! When not feeling terribly well, I still think of this as a comfort food -- though I don't leave the yolk quite as runny due to Salmonella brainwashing.

Bread-and-milk also happened, though not frequently, as it was considered less healthy than cereal. Break up bread, sugar it a bit, pour on milk, and eat.


I was visualising breadcrumbs as the very small crumbs, such as those you use for coating things with. Sorry, Kathy, it still sounds revolting to me, but then the thought of runny egg makes me want to throw up anyway. I can just about manage a boiled egg and soldiers, but only if the yolk is slightly runny and everything else set.

Bread and milk never sounded too bad to me, but we had that when I was little - at least my sister did. We called it pobs, and it was crouton-sized bits of bread in a bowl, add hot milk, butter and sugar, stir and eat. Being lactose intolerant I had chocolate flavoured soya milk and bread and butter, which never tasted as nice as pobs looked!!!

 


#36:  Author: SusanLocation: Carlisle PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2005 10:51 am


I had completely forgotten until I read Kathy's post we had what we called 'Cuppy Egg'. This was a boiled egg (not to lightly) shelled into a cup and mashed up with butter. No breadcrumbs added was a comfort food when ill or when we needed a quick supper if we had been out in the evening and got home late. We ate it with toast soldiers. I think Mum gave it to us like this so we would eat the white as well as the yolk.

It was the egg and breadcrumbs I was referring to as revolting earlier as I imagined the egg barely cooked. Like Lulie I like the yolk soft but the white nicely cooked.

Lulie have never (that I remember eating) had bread and milk but I have also heard it referred to as pobs in this area.

 


#37:  Author: Kathy_SLocation: midwestern US PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2005 12:42 pm


Lulie wrote:
I can just about manage a boiled egg and soldiers, but only if the yolk is slightly runny and everything else set.

If it makes you feel any better, I can assure you that the white was always well set -- just the inside of the yolk was runny, and that was quickly absorbed by the bread.

 




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