Pronouncing names
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#1: Pronouncing names Author: Fiona McLocation: Bendigo, Australia PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 12:52 am
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I have always pronounced Margot with a T on the end but have recently met a couple of Margot's whom pronouce their name as 'Margo' with the T silent. Does everyone pronounce it like this and have I always just said it wrong or is there two different variations to it. The other one was I met a Wanda who pronounced it Wand-a. I always thought it was pronounced Van-da or Wan-da. I am now wondering is Bride, Bride or Brid as in the first part of her name Brid-get.

Does anyone else have any idea? Very Happy

#2:  Author: SugarLocation: second star to the right! PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 1:02 am
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I say Margo, BrideE (some people pronounce it bride (as in bride and groom, but I've never met anyone who pronounces it like that in r/l) Wanda is CS terms should be Vanda as W = V but in America and the like there is Wanda as in a fish called wanda the film.

#3:  Author: RosieLocation: Land of Three-Quarters Sky PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 1:16 am
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And there is always the quite splendid story about Margot Asquith:

Quote:
While visiting Hollywood one year, Margot Asquith had occasion to meet the famous platinum-blonde film star Jean Harlow.
Not only did Harlow make the mistake of addressing Lady Asquith by her Christian name (Margot), she also pronounced it to rhyme with "pot." Asquith was not amused. "My dear, the 't' is silent," she snidely remarked, "as in Harlow."

#4:  Author: KateLocation: Ireland PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 1:26 am
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I say Margo, Bride as in bride and groom (so you have met someone in RL who says it like that Sugar, even if I didn't say it in your presence Laughing) and I say Wanda with a w even though I know it should be a v...

#5:  Author: MiaLocation: London PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 3:38 am
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In Peggy (I think) Lalla and Polly say something about Bride's name and Peggy says something about St Bride's Bay, which is as in bride and groom, so I've always thought it was pronounced that way. I'm now wondering if that was in the hb or in the pb as well.

I've never come across a MargoT - I would say Margo.

#6:  Author: Alison HLocation: Manchester PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 10:40 am
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Rosie, that was exactly what I was going to say about the name Margot - great minds think alive! In Ros Lilley's first letter home she refers to "Margo", which suggests that that's how Margot Maynard pronounced her name.

I've never met anyone called Bride, only people who pronounce and spell their name Bridie, but Peggy tells someone (Polly Winterton, I think) that Bride's name is like St Bride's Bay, and that's pronounced bride as in wedding. Sorry Mia - just noticed that that's exactly what you said!

Wanda would be pronounced Vanda in Austria, but I always pronounce it Wanda with a w! And I always pronounce Grizel as Grizzle because Reunion (in which she says that it's Griz-ELLE) was one of the last ones I read and I was too used to thinking of her as Grizzle to change by then!

#7:  Author: KarryLocation: Stoke on Trent PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 10:41 am
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Margot was the only short that my Mum allowed, and only from my Dad. She NEVER responded to anything else (no Daisy, Peggy, Meg, Maggie etc!) It was always the full Margaret.

#8:  Author: SugarLocation: second star to the right! PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 10:55 am
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Kate wrote:
I say Margo, Bride as in bride and groom (so you have met someone in RL who says it like that Sugar, even if I didn't say it in your presence Laughing) and I say Wanda with a w even though I know it should be a v...


I actually meant someone who was called bride calling themselves bride (as in bride and groom) Wink

#9:  Author: KateLocation: Ireland PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 12:08 pm
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That actually makes a lot more sense now that I think about it! I blame the lateness of the hour!!

#10:  Author: claireLocation: South Wales PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 12:31 pm
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Jack Lambert has difficulties remembering that Wanda (the younger) isn't spelt with a V so I think that's definitive of how it's meant to be pronounced in the series

When I was younger I used to go with MargoT but changed at somepoint, Rosamund's mispelling gives it away

#11:  Author: ArielLocation: Hither Green, London PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 1:18 pm
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Ooooh, I have often thought about starting a thread like this...

Do you pronounce it/how do you pronounce:

Margia (with a hard 'g') or
Marjia? (like marjoram and Margery?)

Sess-ill or
See-sill (Cecil)?

Ann-iss or
Ann-ees? (Annis)

Eilunedd ???

#12:  Author: LissLocation: Richmond PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 1:41 pm
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Heh - I love that anecdote about Margot Asquith!!

#13:  Author: CarysLocation: London PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 1:44 pm
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One of my friends is called Eilunedd but there are quite a few different spellings of the name so she spells it Eluned.
I tend to pronounce it E-Leen-id.

#14:  Author: AlexLocation: Manchester PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 1:45 pm
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I always say (well, think) Sess-sill for Cecil, Mar-jah, Ann-iss and Eileen-ud, even though I know the latter is definitely wrong...I'm pretty sure that dd is more like th, but I have no idea how the whole ensemble comes together.

#15:  Author: alicatLocation: Wiltshire PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 3:19 pm
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Eilunedd always had me stumped - I knew about the th for dd bit but still couldn't make that fit anywhere so have always called her 'eil erm' in my head....surely there must be welsh speakers out there who can help?

I'm for Cee-cil rather than sess-cil - and I never even thought that you said Bride any other way that the person who is getting married.....

do people say Lal-la or Lar-la??? surely not La-la?? (or was she an early teletubby?

and while we're on the subject - do people say Len as in the boy's name or Layne as in He-lay-na? I met someone recently called Laine who pronounces it Lay-ni who set me wondering if I had been wrong all my life - on this thing as on so many others!

#16:  Author: LexiLocation: Liverpool PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 3:31 pm
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Eilunedd - I know this is very wrong but I always think of it as something along the lines of "eye-lin-udd" Embarassed Welsh pronouniciation is clearly not my strong point!

Margia with a hard g

Sess-cil - I think cee-cil sounds awful.

I've just tried pronouncing Lalla in all the ways alicat mentions in her post and I don't think any of them quite match how I'd say it Confused Maybe the first one but it would rhyme with pallor.

I only found out through another thread on here recently that you don't pronounce Thekla the way I'd always thought!

#17:  Author: JayBLocation: SE England PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 4:01 pm
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Marjia - when I tried saying Margia with a hard g out loud, I found it quite difficult and awkward to say.

Sessil - because that's how the Cec in Cecilia is pronounced. I didn't know anyone said See-sil until there was a character called Cecil in, I think, Dynasty, and it was pronounced Seesil.

Lal-a. It's a nickname for Alice, so Alice - Al - Lal - Lala.

#18:  Author: MiaLocation: London PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 4:06 pm
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Eilunedd = as Carys says above - she should know! Laughing

Lalla = Layla
Len = Len, not Laine. I don't think EBD would have made her Hel-ay-na, she would be the same as the Shakespeare, Helen-a, ergo Len.
Cecil = Sessil.
Margia = Marja

#19:  Author: macyroseLocation: Great White North (Canada) PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 8:13 pm
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Margot - Mar-go
Eilunned - I-loon-ed
Bride (as in here comes the)
Wanda (as in a fish called...)
Grizel - Grizzle (rhymes with drizzle)
Annis - Ann-iss
Margia - Mar-jah
Cecil - Sess-il
Lalla (like the teletbubby)
Len (as it's written)
Elisaveta - Ell-iss-a-veet-a
Gisela - Zhi-zell-a (on one of the audiobooks I have it's pronounced Gee-zell-a, like geezer, which I thought had an awful sound).

While I know from the books that my pronunciations of Grizel and Wanda are definitely wrong, it's too late for me to change them now.

Does anyone else find that certain names bring up certain images? For instance Cecil makes me think of a bald, middle aged man. Also I wonder if I'm the only person who when they think of a name, the first letter brings to mind a colour. Like L names are green, M's are red and C's are yellow. I can go right through the alphabet like that.

#20:  Author: LizzieCLocation: Canterbury, UK PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 9:18 pm
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macyrose wrote:
Does anyone else find that certain names bring up certain images? For instance Cecil makes me think of a bald, middle aged man. Also I wonder if I'm the only person who when they think of a name, the first letter brings to mind a colour. Like L names are green, M's are red and C's are yellow. I can go right through the alphabet like that.


It doesn't happen to me, though sometimes if I have read a book or an article while listening to one song/album only the song/s or texts bring each other to mind (Goblet of Fire makes me thing of Savage Garden's Affirmation album and vice versa). Is it possible that you have Colour Synesthesia? I've heard of it before now and your post made me think of it. I have to admit it sounds rather interesting.

#21:  Author: KarryLocation: Stoke on Trent PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 10:10 pm
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macyrose said
Quote:
Gisela - Zhi-zell-a (on one of the audiobooks I have it's pronounced Gee-zell-a, like geezer, which I thought had an awful sound).
My sister had a German penfriend through school,(they went on exchange visits,) and this is how her name was pronounced

#22:  Author: macyroseLocation: Great White North (Canada) PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 10:26 pm
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Thanks, LizzieC, for mentioning the term Color Synethesia. I had a feeling there was a name for it but couldn't remember what it was. It's very likely that that's what my letter/colour association is. I'm going to do some research on it.

Karry wrote:
Quote:
My sister had a German penfriend through school,(they went on exchange visits,) and this is how her name was pronounced

I'm not saying that the audiobook wasn't correct, just that it has such a hard sound to it as opposed to the softer G I had been using in my own pronunciation (like the ballet Giselle but with an 'a' at the end).

#23:  Author: PadoLocation: Connecticut, USA PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 10:34 pm
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I too had been saying a softer Ghi-zell-a until I met a German friend who pronounced her name Geese-eh-la. So I've switched it over.

I say Margia with a soft "j" sound, but am not sure where to place the accent - is it Mar-GI-a, MARG-ia, Mar-gi-A?

#24:  Author: BillieLocation: The south of England. PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2008 1:49 pm
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macyrose wrote:

Does anyone else find that certain names bring up certain images? For instance Cecil makes me think of a bald, middle aged man. Also I wonder if I'm the only person who when they think of a name, the first letter brings to mind a colour. Like L names are green, M's are red and C's are yellow. I can go right through the alphabet like that.


My sister and I have been known to argue fiercely about this point, memorably whether Wednesday looks red or green. I think L names are yellow, M names red and C names pink, actually. Which may be why I always picture Len as blonde and Margot chestnut even though I know they're not.

How on earth do you pronounce Yseult, everyone? I usually cheat and call her "Isolde" as the other version of Tristan and.

I know Wanda is Vanda but can't remember to pronounce it that way, and I used to say Margot with a T on the end when I was very little. And Eilunedd, I tend to say "Eye-lyoon-ed" though I'm sure I'm wrong.

#25:  Author: LexiLocation: Liverpool PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2008 2:49 pm
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I pronounce it "Iz-ult", mainly because I used to know someone called Ysanne and that was pronounced "Iz-anne"

#26:  Author: JayBLocation: SE England PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2008 2:51 pm
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Yseult - I had no idea when I was young, now I say 'Iz-ult'. I assume it's just a variant spelling for Isolde, so the pronunciation should be similar, I would think.

Eilunedd - El-un-ed or El-un-eth.

#27:  Author: FleuryLocation: Epsom PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2008 6:09 pm
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how are you supposed to pronounce Thekla then? it's the only one that's really had me stumped! (although i did have to pull faces over a few of them)

oops! just edited it having just realised theres a whole thread about Thekla! Embarassed

#28:  Author: macyroseLocation: Great White North (Canada) PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2008 10:43 pm
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I keep pronouncing it Thek-la even knowing from the other thread that it should be Tek-la. Iseult is a hard one for me. I say it as Iz-ult even though I have a feeling that's wrong.

Billie wrote:
Quote:
I think L names are yellow, M names red and C names pink, actually.

It's nice to know there's somone else on the board who also sees letters with colours. Very Happy

#29:  Author: Mrs RedbootsLocation: London, UK PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 4:06 pm
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Cecil - Sess-il (it was my grandfather's name, and that's how he said it; also my Aunt, named after him, was Cecily, and that was definitely Sess-ly)
Bride - as in bride and groom, it never occurred to me to pronounce it any other way.
Wanda - as in a fish called, although I know that's wrong! Gradually putting a V sound into it!
Gisela - gradualy moving towards "Gee-say-la" with a hard G, as that's the correct German pronunciation, but it's apt to be "Giselle-a" (as in French pronunciation) if I don't stop & think.
Thekla - Tek-la (the h is silent, but again, difficult to remember if you first read the books as a child & didn't know that).
Yseult - Iz-erlt
Eilunedd - Ellen-eth (which is as near as I can come to it, and when I used the story in a recent sermon, she was firmly transliterated to "Eileen")
Margia with a soft "g" is correct (it's a variant of Marjorie, I believe, or vice versa)
Lalla with a short a (also the one in White Boots), only I have to admit that there is one place where EBD spells her like the Tellytubby![/list]

#30:  Author: lavenderLocation: Peak District, UK PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2008 12:48 pm
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I understand Evadne should be pronounced Evad - nee (I think) but in my head I always read it as Ever - dane, as that's what I thought it was when I first read the books.

#31:  Author: KateLocation: Ireland PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2008 5:24 pm
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I say Sess-eel for Cecil, because she's a girl and to me Sess-ill is a boy's name. Also, it's short for Cecilia which is Sess-eel-ya to me.

There was a bit in a QI episode about colour synesthesia and Billie and Macyrose, you'll be pleased to know that Stephen Fry and Alan Davies both see days of the week with colours. Smile I see the months of the year in a very specific circular pattern and I have colours associated with them. Not the days of the week so much though.

#32:  Author: LollyLocation: Back in London PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2008 1:20 pm
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JayB wrote:
Yseult - I had no idea when I was young, now I say 'Iz-ult'. I assume it's just a variant spelling for Isolde, so the pronunciation should be similar, I would think.
.


Isolde is the German version and I believe Yseult is Old French (might be wrong but I think that is how it is spelt in the Morte d'Arthur) - I think it is pronounced Ees-ohlt rather than Is-olda

#33:  Author: Fiona McLocation: Bendigo, Australia PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2008 10:57 pm
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What about Ailie? Is it pronounced Ail-lee or Ally given her name is really Aline? I've always said Ail-lee.

#34:  Author: macyroseLocation: Great White North (Canada) PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2008 11:14 pm
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I pronounce it Aay-lee. For Evadne I say Ev-ad-knee but say her shortened name as Eee-vee.
What about Richenda? I have a feeling that it's with a soft sh as in Ri-shen-da but I can't shop calling her Rich-en-da.

#35:  Author: andiLocation: London PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2008 11:31 pm
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Possibly slightly OT, but how do you pronounce "Chaletian' (as in the school mag)? My mind persists in saying it as Shal-ett-ee-yan even though I suspect it's probably supposed to be Shal-ay-shun.

#36:  Author: macyroseLocation: Great White North (Canada) PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2008 11:43 pm
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I call it Shal-ay-shun.

#37:  Author: MonaLocation: Hertfordshire PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2008 8:58 am
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I say Shal-ett-ee-yan. Although now you mention it, it probably should be Shal-ay-shun.

#38:  Author: MiaLocation: London PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2008 11:23 am
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I have always wondered this and I when met someone from the Chartered Institute of Linguistics at a work function, I asked him by writing it down. He said it would be Shal eT ee an because it would a) be anglicised and b) the i and a together after a t in this case would suggest you do say the t. Of course he used more sophisticated terms to say this. I was surprised as I had always thought Shaleyshan.

Of course he may not be 100% correct either - he'd never heard of it before of course.

#39:  Author: BillieLocation: The south of England. PostPosted: Fri Jan 11, 2008 12:45 pm
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I pronounce it "Sha-lay-ti-an" because that's how it was pronounced on one of my story-tapes. Hmmm... wonder if I still have that.

#40:  Author: Alison HLocation: Manchester PostPosted: Fri Jan 11, 2008 1:59 pm
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I say Shal-ett-ee-yan but I don't know why!

#41:  Author: TorLocation: London PostPosted: Fri Jan 11, 2008 4:21 pm
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I obviously didn't read very carefully, but I've always said Thel -ka. I thought it was spelt like that too. Wasn't until the previous thread i even noticed I'd been wrong all these years. I'd be a terrible proof reader!
Even now, it is hard to break the habit.

I say Shall-AY-ian, with the ian very quick so it's not quite as strong as 'Yan', but a little more than 'an'.... if that makes sense.

the silliest pronunciation i know i do (and can't stop myself without serious effort) is to actually say (in my head!) 'Mill' or 'middle' wherever i read Mlle or Mdlle. Embarassed

#42:  Author: ElbeeLocation: Surrey PostPosted: Fri Jan 11, 2008 5:23 pm
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Tor wrote:
the silliest pronunciation i know i do (and can't stop myself without serious effort) is to actually say (in my head!) 'Mill' or 'middle' wherever i read Mlle or Mdlle. Embarassed

I say "middle" too, you're not the only one Laughing

I think when you read the books when you are young and "ignorant" of proper pronunciations, you choose a way of saying it and it just sticks, even once you are old enough to learn the real pronunciation!

I say Shal-ett-ee-yan too.

#43:  Author: BillieLocation: The south of England. PostPosted: Sat Jan 12, 2008 11:28 pm
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Well, I read "Mdlle" as "Muddle." Laughing

#44:  Author: Alison HLocation: Manchester PostPosted: Sat Jan 12, 2008 11:42 pm
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Tor wrote:

the silliest pronunciation i know i do (and can't stop myself without serious effort) is to actually say (in my head!) 'Mill' or 'middle' wherever i read Mlle or Mdlle. Embarassed


Yup, me too!

#45:  Author: RebeccaLocation: Oxford PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2008 10:09 pm
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And me!

#46:  Author: KarryLocation: Stoke on Trent PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 11:26 am
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I always thought it was 'madel' being vaugely aware that it was short for mademoiselle!

#47:  Author: TorLocation: London PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 1:07 pm
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so glad i am not alone there!

as an aside, one of the banes of my life is having a much wider 'reading' vocabulary than spoken one. So many words i have never heard out load, and it is so hard to break those childhood habits of pronunciation!

#48:  Author: TamzinLocation: Edinburgh PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 1:54 pm
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Kate wrote:

I see the months of the year in a very specific circular pattern and I have colours associated with them. Not the days of the week so much though.


Hey I do that too! I see the days of the week as a specific circle. A slightly different circle shows me the progression of months in the year. And I have another odd loopy circular pattern for all of the centuries of history. If I'm thinking of a specific historical event/period I see it on it's place on the pattern. I can't imagine how people who don't do this can visualise the passing of time at all.

#49:  Author: Mrs RedbootsLocation: London, UK PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 5:28 pm
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Tor wrote:
so glad i am not alone there!

as an aside, one of the banes of my life is having a much wider 'reading' vocabulary than spoken one. So many words i have never heard out load, and it is so hard to break those childhood habits of pronunciation!
Oh, me too!

And my daughter did, too, probably because I read to her rather less than my mother read to me, not being very good at reading aloud! So she misread "Daphne" as "Daphoon", which made me laugh at the time.

Incidentally, I tend to pronounce the magazine "Shall-ee-shun". As for "Mlle" and "Mdlle", I tend to mentally pronounce them "Mam'zelle", whereas when it's spelt out, I mentally pronounce it "Ma'moiselle", which is more French anyway....

When I first read the books, which I didn't much as a kid, liking them much better once I was grown up, I hadn't yet learnt German, so mentally pronounced the definite article in "Die Rosen" as if it were the English word...

#50:  Author: KateLocation: Ireland PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 7:10 pm
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Mrs Redboots wrote:
When I first read the books, which I didn't much as a kid, liking them much better once I was grown up, I hadn't yet learnt German, so mentally pronounced the definite article in "Die Rosen" as if it were the English word...


I still do..! What way is it meant to be pronounced? Laughing Embarassed

#51:  Author: Travellers JoyLocation: Middle of Nowhere PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 7:18 pm
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Kate wrote:
Mrs Redboots wrote:
When I first read the books, which I didn't much as a kid, liking them much better once I was grown up, I hadn't yet learnt German, so mentally pronounced the definite article in "Die Rosen" as if it were the English word...


I still do..! What way is it meant to be pronounced? Laughing Embarassed


'ie' is pronounced 'ee' and 'ei' is pronounced 'eye' so 'die' is 'dee' and 'mein' is 'mine'

#52:  Author: miss_maeveLocation: Buckinghamshire, UK PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 7:57 pm
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I'm never sure about 'Rosalie'.
Is it Rose-uh-lee or Roz-ah-lee?

#53:  Author: RosieLocation: Land of Three-Quarters Sky PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 8:32 pm
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As a Rosalie, I make it "Rose uh lee" but do have to put up with various other pronunciations... Hmm, the middle syllable is not stressed at all when I say it, so am not entirely sure if it's "uh" or "ah".

Yes, I am sitting on my bed repeating my name out loud. Perfectly normal behaviour. Ish.

#54:  Author: ChelseaLocation: Your Imagination PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 11:07 pm
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Rosie wrote:
As a Rosalie, I make it "Rose uh lee" but do have to put up with various other pronunciations... Hmm, the middle syllable is not stressed at all when I say it, so am not entirely sure if it's "uh" or "ah".

Yes, I am sitting on my bed repeating my name out loud. Perfectly normal behaviour. Ish.


If that is the strangest thing you do all week, I'll....eat my hat (not that I have one). Very Happy

#55:  Author: RosieLocation: Land of Three-Quarters Sky PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 11:39 pm
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*looks offended*

Ok, I did end up doing a snake impression trying to spell 'narcissistic' earlier too. Still quite sane I think. And I may have just used an oven mitt as a glove puppet whilst my housemate was on the phone.

#56:  Author: ChelseaLocation: Your Imagination PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 11:51 pm
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I rest my case.

#57:  Author: RosieLocation: Land of Three-Quarters Sky PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2008 12:14 am
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You must have at least one hat.

#58:  Author: Kathy_SLocation: midwestern US PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2008 3:51 am
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I thought she had a toque! Surely she didn't donate her only one to the CBB.

Not that I'd recommend eating it.

#59:  Author: patmacLocation: Yorkshire England PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2008 10:28 am
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I read 'Little Women' long before I knew any French and thought blancmange was pronounced 'blankmangi' and assumed the pudding we ate was spelt 'blamonj'. It was a long while before I discovered they were the same.

I also knew 2 girls at school called Wanda - one was English and pronounced it Wonda and the other, who (I think was Swiss) as Vanda.

#60:  Author: Smile :)Location: Location? What's a location? PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 6:55 pm
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Tor wrote:
the silliest pronunciation i know i do (and can't stop myself without serious effort) is to actually say (in my head!) 'Mill' or 'middle' wherever i read Mlle or Mdlle. Embarassed


I do that to, I also have a habit of reversing vowel order so with me Evadne became Evande, and Thekla became Thelka I'm trying really hard to break this habit!!!

I pronounce:
Margot - Mar-go (although originally pronounced it MargoT I changed early on)
Eilunned - !!DON'T LAUGH!! Ell-une-edd
Bride - as in bride and groom (as people said before it's meant to be like St Bride's Bay)
Wanda - badly I fear with a w insteadof a v!
Grizel - Griz-elle
Annis - Ann-iss
Margia - Mar-jia
Cecil - Sess-il
Lalla (like the teletbubby)
Len (as it's written) Helena should (of course this is just my opinion!) be pronounced like helen-a not hel-lay-na! (a good friend of mine is called helena and having known her and how to pronounce her name since the age of about two it sounds really wrong when people meet her and try to pronounce it the *wrong* way, you often get people who do this repeatedly)
Elisaveta - Ell-iss-veet-a
Ailie - Ay-lee (sort off) (again I have a good friend with this name)
How do you pronounce Alicia - The only person I have ever really met with this name pronounces it A-leee-sha but I know a lot of people tried to say Alisha or aleeceea etc.

#61:  Author: Travellers JoyLocation: Middle of Nowhere PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 7:05 pm
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Smile Smile wrote:

How do you pronounce Alicia - The only person I have ever really met with this name pronounces it A-leee-sha but I know a lot of people tried to say Alisha or aleeceea etc.


All three are correct, so it all depends on the preference of the owner of the name (or the parent who bestowed it in the first instance!). (I say A-lee-sha unless told otherwise.)

#62:  Author: KateLocation: Ireland PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 8:11 pm
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I have a cousin Alisha and it is pronounced Al-ee-sha. We mostly called her Leesha, as that is what she calls herself, as she's not able to say Alisha. She's only 3. Smile

I say Helena Hell-ee-na. So it never made sense to me that Len was short for it...

#63:  Author: claireLocation: South Wales PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 8:15 pm
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A-lee-sea-ah

That's the way we pronounce my daughter's name (Al-iss-ee-a she gets quite a lot and I don't mind that but her name doesn't end in a -sha so the A-lee-sha does grate on me a little - most people have always gone with one of the first two pronounciations)

#64:  Author: Travellers JoyLocation: Middle of Nowhere PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 8:32 pm
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claire wrote:
A-lee-sea-ah

That's the way we pronounce my daughter's name (Al-iss-ee-a she gets quite a lot and I don't mind that but her name doesn't end in a -sha so the A-lee-sha does grate on me a little - most people have always gone with one of the first two pronounciations)


It's the same with Marcia - it can be Marsha or Mar-see-a - so I can see how pronunciation of Alicia can grate when people go with the one you don't like.

#65:  Author: miss_maeveLocation: Buckinghamshire, UK PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 9:21 pm
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I had a friend in junior school called Penelope, more often known as Penny.
Which is as well, because when I was that age, I thought 'Penelope' was pronounced 'Pen-uh-lop.' I dobt she'd have liked that a lot.

#66:  Author: JackiePLocation: Kingston upon Hull PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 10:50 pm
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My sisters middle name (Alicia) was always pronounced as A-liss-ee-a.

My first name gave people problems as well (the proper spelling is Jaclyn) - people seemed always to want to make Jass-lyn out of it - or sometimes even Jocelyn - but it's Jack-lyn - plain and simple.

JackieP

#67:  Author: DawnLocation: Leeds, West Yorks PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 2:40 am
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Chris's current girlfriend is A-liss-eee-a

but shes always called Liss - very clearly with a double s rather than a z sound

#68:  Author: Hannah-LouLocation: Glasgow PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 2:30 pm
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How do you pronounce Jacynth? That's one I've never been sure of.

#69:  Author: KatherineLocation: London, UK PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 2:32 pm
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I say Jack-sinth with the stress on the Jack but Iíve heard people say it should be Jay-sinth.

#70:  Author: LexiLocation: Liverpool PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 3:05 pm
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I've always said it as Jas-inth. Probably wrong though!

#71:  Author: KateLocation: Ireland PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 3:31 pm
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I say Jas-inth - based mostly on the name Jacinta, which I assumed was related...

#72:  Author: Hannah-LouLocation: Glasgow PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 3:38 pm
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For some reason I have an idea that the J should be soft: Yas-inth. No clue where I got that idea from, but it ends up being a pretty wierd-sounding name. Laughing

I assume it is related to Jacinta, also to Hyacinth (spelling???!).

#73:  Author: JayBLocation: SE England PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 3:45 pm
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I'm never sure about 'Jacynth'. I think it is related to Hyacinth, so it should be 'Jasynth'. But then wouldn't Jacynth Lambert be Jass, not Jack?

#74:  Author: MiaLocation: London PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 4:04 pm
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JayB wrote:
But then wouldn't Jacynth Lambert be Jass, not Jack?


Oh no I don't think so. If you worked on that basis Francis would never become Frank Smile

#75:  Author: Laura VLocation: Merseyside PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 4:20 pm
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I always say Jass-sinth but this is because Jacynth is called Jass on a few occasions by close friends.

#76:  Author: Alison HLocation: Manchester PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 4:45 pm
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I always say Jass-sinth.

I assume that Jack Lambert wanted to be Jack to sound "boyish".

#77:  Author: KatherineLocation: London, UK PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 5:58 pm
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JayB wrote:
I'm never sure about 'Jacynth'. I think it is related to Hyacinth, so it should be 'Jasynth'. But then wouldn't Jacynth Lambert be Jass, not Jack?

I found a website that said it was related to Hyacinth.

#78:  Author: miss_maeveLocation: Buckinghamshire, UK PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 7:20 pm
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I say 'Jacynth' too. I actually knew a Jacynth at school years ago, and that's how she always said it. I guess she should know, as it is her own name.

#79:  Author: Mrs RedbootsLocation: London, UK PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 9:09 pm
    —
miss_maeve wrote:
I had a friend in junior school called Penelope, more often known as Penny.
Which is as well, because when I was that age, I thought 'Penelope' was pronounced 'Pen-uh-lop.' I dobt she'd have liked that a lot.


My father pretends he thinks the magazine is called "Ra-di-OH-ti-mees" (with a short "a" at the beginning), as he says "by analogy with Penelope!

However, I was at school with a Helena who pronounced it He-LAY-na, so that tends to be my default pronunciation of the name - and when I saw one today who I hadn't seen for years, I had an awful moment of panic as I couldn't remember which way she said it! I hope to goodness I got it right, but if I didn't, she was kind enough not to correct me!

#80:  Author: gaityrLocation: Singapore PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2008 3:22 pm
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Heh, I love this thread! I've always wondered when reading these names to myself whether I'm pronouncing them right in my head. I always said 'Ja-sinth' and 'He-lay-na' actually. Very Happy

#81:  Author: JennieLocation: Cambridgeshire PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2008 9:14 pm
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Since Jacynth is a variation or derivative of Hyacinth, I should imagine it ought to be pronounced Jasynth.

#82:  Author: KatyaLocation: Lost in translation PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 1:46 am
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I was never sure about Jacynth, but since I liked both 'Jack-inth' and 'Ja-sinth' as names I wasn't too bothered! Laughing

Eilunedd, if that's how it's spelt, should be 'Eye-lin-eth' with the 'th' voiced (as in 'bathe' rather than 'bath'), shoudn't it? 'Dd' is definitely a voiced 'th' sound in Welsh, anyway...



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