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#1: Weekly form lists Author: Alison HLocation: Manchester PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 12:02 pm
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Just been reading Anne of Green Gables for the umpteenth time, and Anne's obsession with outdoing Gilbert in terms of marks just set me thinking about the Chalet School thing of having form lists - apparently incorporating every mark for every single piece of work done - every week. I appreciate that it wouldn't be allowed now in case it caused psychological damage or something Rolling Eyes , but we certainly never had form lists at school in the late '80s/early '90s either.

Does anyone know if it was something that was just done at certain schools, or if it used to be common practice but died out maybe during the '60s?

It must have been very demoralising for the people who weren't academic. Especially when some of the mistresses in the CS books seem to've gone round the room telling them to make more effort!

#2:  Author: RayLocation: Bristol, England PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 12:39 pm
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My dad, who was in school in the 50s and 60s (the latter part of his secondary schooling was done at a grammar school in Bristol, the former part was at a similar type of school in Dublin) mentions coming either second or third in subjects and my mother (who went to a Quaker boarding school having passed the 11+ and been deemed too expensive to send to the nearest high school*) has mentioned form places, but I got the impression from her that it was done bi-termly.

I'd imagine it would be an awful lot of work to do it weekly, considering the number of subjects, though.

Also, to be fair to the CS staff, I don't think they willy-nilly told people to make more effort, just the ones they knew were capable of making more effort (eg Margot Maynard)

Ray *who only had form placings at exam time and that was done by subject, not right across the board*

#3: Re: Weekly form lists Author: JayBLocation: SE England PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 12:53 pm
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Quote:
Does anyone know if it was something that was just done at certain schools, or if it used to be common practice but died out maybe during the '60s?


We had form lists at my (small, private) primary school in the early '60s. I think it was at the end of each term, certainly not every week. (I do have my old school reports tucked away somewhere, but I'm not quite sad enough to dig them out to check.) I don't recall what happened at my brother's state primary.

At grammar school we had form lists for the first three years, I think that was once a year based on school exams. After that we started specialising for O levels, and form lists weren't possible because everyone was doing a different combination of subjects. I don't recall whether we had lists for individual subjects.

It must, as you say, have made an enormous amount of work for either Rosalie or the form mistresses to do it weekly, especially as this was long before computers. And it meant all the mistresses had to keep up with their marking or the lists couldn't be made up.

Jay B.

#4:  Author: CatrinLocation: Newcastle-upon-Tyne PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 1:59 pm
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We also had form lists at my (old-fashioned) grammar school (I left in 2002!) for overall performance at the end of each year, and "position in form" for overall effort and exam performance was marked on reports. I often wondered what the basis were for the effort rankings. I have a suspicion that it was essentially based on the neatness of handwriting.

I have always been slightly puzzled that the heroines of the CS books always seem to be near the top of their form. In some cases there does't seem to be anyone left to be at the bottom.

#5:  Author: Alison HLocation: Manchester PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 2:08 pm
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Poor Yseult Pertwee seemed doomed to be bottom of Inter V/Vb!

It doesn't seem like a very CS thing to've done, really - they criticised Miss Bubb for being obsessed with exam results, and they never actually seemed very interested in how people did in public exams, yet they had these complicated form lists every week Rolling Eyes . In Three Go they seem to've been treated a bit like football league tables - the top few at the end of term got promoted!

& every single form had umpteen end-of-year prizes - wonder how long it took presenting them all. *Represses horrible memories of boring school Speech Days Laughing .*

#6:  Author: ChelseaLocation: Your Imagination PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 2:13 pm
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In my public high school, they posted the "Honour Roll" every term (I think it was anyone with an overall average of at least 75%). Which was ranked and included name and overall average.

You could ask to be removed from it, which I always did (how I did was nobody's business). However, they just whited out your name/mark. Since only very few people opted out and we knew each well, most people would say things like "well, Chelsea must be that white out mark and thus fall between X and Y" Evil or Very Mad Twisted Evil

#7:  Author: LianeLocation: Manchester PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 3:06 pm
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We didn't have form lists. I did option German in my last 2 years and our weekly(ish) vocab test results were pinned on the outside of the door for all to see!

#8:  Author: KateLocation: Ireland PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 5:20 pm
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We had place lists at the end of each year during my degree. It was done by student number rather than name but everyone knew who was who anyway.

#9:  Author: PatLocation: Doncaster PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 7:50 pm
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We knew where we'd come in form with each exam, and the overall position. Exams were twice a year. I think we had a term position too, and that must have been made up from the marks given our course work/homework. I always knew which people to measure myself agaisnt for each subject, and it never bothered me if I did badly in a subject so long as it was one I always did badly in. I knew what standard I usually reached, and that others were better at that subject than me. I don't remember anyone being traumatised - or anything near that! - over marks and position. In fact we were all very eager to see where we'd come.

#10:  Author: MiriamLocation: Jerusalem, Israel PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 8:32 pm
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Enid Blyton mentions it a lot in her school stories. I think it was just standard practice at the time.

You would have probably had a good idea of your level, and known the three or four people you were up against. Someone who was used to coming tenth wouldn't be trying to compete against the person who normally came first, but would feel the they had acheived a lot if they came seventh.

Emerence always comes fairly low in form, though she seems fairly bright. Her brains were probably reseved for 'plotting evil deeds'. Hilda Jukes and Meg Whyte 'comnpete cheerfully for the bottom place on the form lists'. Anyone who is new and just laerning languages (like Rosamund) is 'allowed' to come low in form. Otherwise, all the main characterd do seem to doo well

#11:  Author: Róisín PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 11:18 pm
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I actually think it's a great idea. It wasn't something that *ever* happened in any school or college that I went to, and I think it must have been a good motivation for those places that did have it. Yes, I am blaming my lack of motivation on this. Laughing

#12:  Author: TaraLocation: Malvern, Worcestershire PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 11:44 pm
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Of course in earlier years, pupils were seated in mark order and had to change every week according to where they were placed! I've always wondered what happened to people who tied - on each other's laps, perhaps?

#13:  Author: lizarfauLocation: Melbourne PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 1:55 am
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At the grammar school I attended, we had exams just before Christmas and again in summer, and we were ranked overall based on our marks in the various subjects. Every form was then summoned before the headmaster, and he would then read out lists from last place to first. When your name was called you had to stand up while he told you what he thought of your performance. It was a mixed grammar school and one term a girl finished bottom and cried all the way through the lecture he gave her. Then, after a couple of years, the school became a comprehensive and we stopped having form lists (stopped having a uniform, prefects and many other things too).

I never performed particularly well overall (was well placed in the five subjects I enjoyed, but hovered near the bottom in the seven I disliked), so I never enjoyed these sessions, though at least I wasn't among the bottom ten, who really bore the brunt of all the "pull your socks up" remarks.

The girl who finished bottom, btw, went on to run for England at international level, so boo sucks to the headmaster.

ETA And the girl who always finished top of the class dropped out of school at 17 to have a baby with her abusive boyfriend. Confused

#14:  Author: Kathy_SLocation: midwestern US PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 2:14 am
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The only place we had ranks listed formally (as opposed to university exams posted in grade order by student number) was class rank in high school, based on grades through junior year and required for university entrance. The most upsetting thing about this was, they solved ties alphabetically. Not that they said so, but the three of us just below the state scholarship cutoff couldn't help noticing that we had identical grades to the winners and were ranked in alphabetical order. MOST unfair!

#15:  Author: jenniferLocation: Taiwan PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 3:03 am
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When I was in high school we had the honour roll - students with an A average, and the principal's list - students with straight As. Other than that, it was report cards with marks (that went on your transcript) and midterm reports.

In elementary school I remember the report cards being quite long - a grade for each section (Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, Social Studies, Science, Gym etc) with sub sections marked (E)xcellent, (G)ood, (S)atisfactory and (N)eeds improvement.

In either case there was no formal ranking, and the only official recognition was the end of year prizes in academics, athletics, and service.

My younger brother went through an experimental phase in his elementary school system where they had instituted a system with no formal grades or marks and only anecdotal reports, with the teachers strongly discouraged from making negative comments at all. This was paired with the removal of the formal teaching of spelling and grammar to encourage free expression and the idea that children would learn best if allowed to 'work at their own pace'. It didn't last long, as your average eight year old tends not to be particularly self motivated.


Ironically, I've found as I have moved through the education system that marks aren't a great indicator of success as you move to the next stage of the system. The people who had the top marks and prizes in elementary school often had an indifferent finish in high school and didn't go on to further education. There were people in high school who had top marks, were on the student council, played sports, got scholarships, who dropped out of university in the first semester because they couldn't handle it, or changed majors four times in the first three years. There were students in grad school who had top marks and massive scholarships from undergrad, but couldn't handle research and self directed learning.

On the other hand, there were students with okay but not spectacular marks in high school who, when motivated and interested (and sometimes with a bit more maturity) did just fine in university, and students who just scraped into grad school who outlasted the star pupils and went on to have very successful careers.

The problems with SATs and GREs in the US illustrate the difficulties of ranking students by marks quite effectively. [Don't even get me started on "No Child Left Behind" Evil or Very Mad]


I think the CS system would be hard on students who were capable but slow workers - I had classmates who did just fine, but took their time to do their homework, and had to study hard. If their prep hours were strictly regulated and they had no time to fit in the extra work they needed to do, then they would have done quite badly. In a non boarding school setting they compensated by spending more time on homework and less on extra-curricular activities.

#16:  Author: CharlotteLocation: Home in Wrexham!!! :D Except when I'm not... PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 7:27 am
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We had them every 2 (ish) weeks at my prep school and I'm not very Psycholgically harmed... Twisted Evil (and that was only 4 years ago!)

#17:  Author: Alison HLocation: Manchester PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 7:47 am
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Kathy, I can't believe you were done out of a scholarship on alphabetical order - that's awful!

#18:  Author: ChangnoiLocation: Milwaukee, USA PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 1:27 pm
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I would have LOVED form order. We didn't have it, obviously, but it would have made poor old no-self-esteem Chang, with such charming nicknames circa age 11 as "Walking Dictionary" and "Four-Eyes Brainiac" feel slightly happier Mad .

We did, of course, post university exam results and some exam results even in high school by "secret code". The prof hung the list on the door; you checked your code.

Actually, in high school, now that I remember, one of the teachers would, after each exam, announce everyone's name and a number. Then, at the very end, he would do some sort of math thing, that always varied. Like: "Now, take the number I gave you, and, if you're a woman, multiply it by five and subtract seven and that's your score. If you're a man, multiply by three and add eighteen and that's your score." Or: "If your last name begins with A-M, subtract seventeen points and multiply by two to get your real score", etc. I think he was great. So he made this big production out of announcing the marks and we never knew what he'd do to actually convert his system to your real score.

The other thing he did was he set up a giant inter-class game of Risk based on your exam marks (it was a world history class). Once you figured out what marks you actually did get on an exam, if you got an A+, you won four armies for your class, an A won you two armies, and a B won you one. The day after the exam marks came back was devoted to deploying the armies and electing someone general for the day to invade the other classes' countries.

This teacher ALSO, based on the end of the semester marks, awarded the ISSNOCSM award. Periodically throughout the semester he would announce, of all his classes, who was in contention for the award, and then he would award it at the end of the semester, take your photo, and make you give a spot-supper type speech. ISSNOCSM? I'm So Smart No One Can Stand Me. Sadly, I was runner up both semesters. Sad

So, I would have liked form marks, but what I got wasn't too bad...

Chang

#19:  Author: Alison HLocation: Manchester PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 1:31 pm
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I love the sound of that teacher!

Especially as he taught history Very Happy .

All we got at school were subject prizes and general "high achievement" prizes at the end of the 5th year Rolling Eyes .

#20:  Author: KateLocation: Ireland PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 1:48 pm
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What a cool teacher, Chang! Smile

#21:  Author: Laura VLocation: Merseyside, UK PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 1:51 pm
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we never really had form lists at secondary school, we were just streamed according to abilities.
However when it came to the awards for our GCSEs those people who were deemed to have put in the most effort, regardless of ability, were given additional prizes for their achievements. A much nicer system in my opinion!

#22:  Author: Loryat PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 8:32 pm
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We didn't do form marks at my school but I suspect I would have liked it (being a competitive brainy sort of brat) because I came top in my year in a couple of exams and would have liked everyone to know it!

We had streaming according to abilities. But because I went to a really awful school, basically if you weren't in the top three classes (or top two in some subjects) you were pretty much doomed to failure. I don't know if giving marks out would have motivated some underachievers to do better, or if it would have just led to them getting depressed and over achievers getting battered.

While I think I would have enjoyed form marks, however, it can't have been very nice to be in the bottom section and being the very bottom would have been terrible. So on the whole I think it's probably a good thing it's more or less died out.

Another thing that seems silly about the system is the way they take everything into account, even art and other such subjects, according to Three Go. It seems to me a bit thick that someone could be brilliant at every subject except art and therefore not come top because they had a particularly bad mark for it. After all, you can only be so good at art without talent. And how did they grade art anyway? With marks out of a hundred, or with general grades?

#23:  Author: Loryat PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 8:35 pm
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Laura V wrote:

However when it came to the awards for our GCSEs those people who were deemed to have put in the most effort, regardless of ability, were given additional prizes for their achievements. A much nicer system in my opinion!

I'm not sure if I agree with awards for effort. Teachers don't really know how hard you've tried after all. They always thought I tried because I was pretty quiet, but actually I'm really lazy. Also, my school had an awards ceremony where you got awards for both achievement and effort, and me and my friends always used to feel that an award for effort would be kind of like saying, well, you didn't do very well, but at least you tried; here's a pat on the head.

#24:  Author: RosieLocation: Brest. Still amuses me... PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 8:43 pm
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I hated the achievement awards at my school. Possibly because I never
won any. Yes, I am still bitter.

#25:  Author: MiriamLocation: Jerusalem, Israel PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 8:50 pm
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I don't think marks for art would make much difference. Her Laubach would have stormed at everybody, told them all that they were incompetant, unseeing, etc, and given them all zero - except maybe Vi Lucy who might have merited 2 or 3. Evil or Very Mad

I don't think there would have been grades for art though. There is never any mention of an exam for it (ecept atg puplic exam level, and then only optionally). I think it would have been clasified as a social accomplishment rather than an academic subject - like needlework or music - and not part of the grading system.

#26:  Author: Loryat PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 8:54 pm
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Rosie wrote:
I hated the achievement awards at my school. Possibly because I never
won any. Yes, I am still bitter.

I only ever won two and strangely enough they weren't even for my best subjects! I'm mainly over it though. I think the whole systems a bit unfair though. Either they should give awards to the people with the best results, or not give any. Teachers' bias comes into it a bit too often for my liking (though I'm not saying this is why I didn't get any).

miriam wrote:
I don't think marks for art would make much difference. Her Laubach would have stormed at everybody, told them all that they were incompetant, unseeing, etc, and given them all zero - except maybe Vi Lucy who might have merited 2 or 3.

I don't think there would have been grades for art though. There is never any mention of an exam for it (ecept atg puplic exam level, and then only optionally). I think it would have been clasified as a social accomplishment rather than an academic subject - like needlework or music - and not part of the grading system.


In Three Go (this might be the only book it's ever mentioned in) they get the results for every class, including art. Verity-Anne comes bottom in it.

#27:  Author: ChairLocation: Rochester, Kent PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 9:07 pm
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When I went to Junior School, my Gran always used to ask me who was top of my form when she came to visit us. I used to look at her completley blankly! I would just list the people who were always doing well in class.

At my 1st Secondary School, we didn't have end of year exams. We had them though at my 2nd Secondary School. In Year 9, I came joint 1st in French. Shocked I can't remember a lot of French now, though.

The same year, I was in Set 2 for English. In the SATs tests, another girl and I both achieved Level 6 which was the highest anyone got in our set. She moved up to Set 1 but I stayed in Set 2. It wasn't on alphabetical order though.

#28:  Author: ClareLocation: Liverpool PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 9:16 pm
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Loryat wrote:
I don't know if giving marks out would have motivated some underachievers to do better, or if it would have just led to them getting depressed and over achievers getting battered.


Have seen both. Set 3 of 4 for RE, bottom class entered for GCSE, I told one boy his mark (narrowly missed a C which is awesome for set 3). The rest wanted their marks read out. It inspired them to do their best in their next test - vast improvement in grades Smile However poor boy who gets the top each time is now being called 'priest'.

So original. Rolling Eyes

#29:  Author: RayLocation: Bristol, England PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2006 6:19 am
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I think the most hysterical (read: stupid) streaming system I've come across was the one my school implimented for science when my year began working towards GCSEs.

We were mixed up across the year for science in sets d1-d4 and we were all told: No, no; these sets aren't done by academic ability.

We looked at the make-up of the sets and went: Yeah, right it's not by academic ability.

We *knew* who was good at the various disciplines of science and who wasn't and it was blindingly obvious, by who was where, that those who were good at science were in either d2 or d4 and those who were not so good at science were in either d1 or d3 (with those who were barely trusted to light a bunsen burner, much less form anything explosive, mostly being congrigated in d1).

Coincidentally, when the separate science sylabus came out (late) and the science department decided to offer it to us, those in d2 and d4 were more or less expected to take it, those in d3 were offered it but warned it would be tough and those in d1 were almost actively discouraged from doing it.

But the sets weren't formed on academic ability! /sarcasm

(Should anyone be interested, I was in d4 and I did end up doing the separate science course - mostly on the grounds of: If I'm going to have to do all three sciences, I'm bloody well going to have a grade for them!)

Ray *scientifically minded*

#30:  Author: JayBLocation: SE England PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2006 7:09 am
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At my secondary school, the only prizes were for achievement at O Level. Anyone who got six (we sat eight) got a prize. Very few people did not get a prize. The prize was student's choice of books up to a certain value, presented at Speech Day the summer term following, ie a year after O Levels. Winners got to go up on stage and shake hands with Guest of Honour.

Jay B.

#31:  Author: LesleyLocation: Allhallows, Kent PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2006 7:58 am
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Loryat wrote:
I'm not sure if I agree with awards for effort. Teachers don't really know how hard you've tried after all. They always thought I tried because I was pretty quiet, but actually I'm really lazy. Also, my school had an awards ceremony where you got awards for both achievement and effort, and me and my friends always used to feel that an award for effort would be kind of like saying, well, you didn't do very well, but at least you tried; here's a pat on the head.


I think I agree with you Loryat - when I was at school I was best friends with a girl that both my parents and the teachers looked on as a BAD INFLUENCE. Because she never bothered working and was always far more interested in boys than homework it was assumed by everyone that she stopped me. Both Debbie and I knew that (in Debbie's words)
Quote:
"you just work and take no notice of what I'm doing or saying."

It wasn't until years later, when, still friendly with Debbie, that my parents acknowledged that they had been wrong. And I can remember more than one teacher coming up to me after end of year exams saying how surprised they were at my (good) results.

If our school had given prizes for effort I'd have got nothing - because all the teachers were convinced that I didn't work purely because I was friends with someone who didn't.

#32:  Author: Rosy-JessLocation: Gloucestershire-London-Aberystwyth PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2006 8:01 am
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My secondary school went all out on prizegiving. There were two awards for each form (8-12 forms, depending on year group), one for achievement and one for improvement (read: effort). There were then subject prizes for most of the exam years, for the highest achiever at GCSE and A Level, for prefects and the head boy and head girl, for service to the school, subject prizes for non-exam years, sports prizes for individual, team and house achievement and also ad hoc prizes for things like'bravery' which were only awarded in exceptional circumstances. And there was always some alumni-type-person wafting around for you to aspire to. Rolling Eyes

I think I had prizes in history, netball, english and for service to the school at various points.

#33:  Author: Alison HLocation: Manchester PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2006 8:11 am
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Ours were all presented at Speech Day, which was always the first Monday of July - it was always a red hot day, the hall was always v stuffy, and some very boring former pupil always made a very long speech Laughing . Prizewinners (only got prizes in the final year) were allowed to choose books up to the value of the prize, but you had to order the books at the bookshop and then the headmistress vetted your choice Rolling Eyes before the books were delivered to the school! We didn't have to wear uniform in the Sixth Form, and everyone used to make comments on whatever the prizewinners wore when they went up to collect the prizes.

I vaguely remember wearing some really awful navy blue thing which I thought was wonderful at the time!

#34:  Author: TiffanyLocation: Is this a duck I see behind me? PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2006 9:29 am
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My secondary school had quite a nifty system of giving everyone a grade for achievement (1-5) and for effort (A-E) in each subject on our annual reports: but in practice if you were getting 1s or 2s (the best) for achievement, they gave you the As for effort too, regardless of whether you needed to do any work to do well in that subject. So by being brightish, I managed to appear very hardworking... Rolling Eyes

I would have liked form places or what-have-you; it would have formalised what already happened, that is that people matched themselves up with others of about their standard, and competed against them.

#35:  Author: RosieLocation: Brest. Still amuses me... PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2006 11:35 am
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Rosy, your school's prize giving sounds an awful lot like mine! It was the lower school that had the effort awards, whereas the upper was still very much 'Old Grammar School' in a lot of things and thus prizes were pretty much just on academic/sporting achievement.

#36:  Author: JunoLocation: Kent PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2006 3:44 pm
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In my year at GCSE, we had prizes for achievement, where anyone who got all A's got one. It was a £10 book token and a bit of card as a bookplate to put in the front of the book you bought. I spent mine on a CD!

Then when I did A Levels, they'd introduced a system for the GCSE year where practically everyone got some prize or other.

#37:  Author: little_sarahLocation: Liverpool/Manchester PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2006 5:07 pm
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My school seemed to be quite bizarre, in that the sports awards and academic awards were completely separate. It was probably a reflection of what the school as a whole thought was more important, esp as it was quite an academically weak school, and hardly any of my year went on to do A Levels (there's about 10 people out of my year of approx. 400 who've gone on to uni).

The sports presentation evening was on a night in early July, everyone would get really dressed up and bring their parents, and the teacher's band played for us. There were awards for all sports for every year for both sexes, plus a 'sportsmanship' award for every year (basically, thanks for trying really hard even though you're rubbish- I won one of these!), plus a couple of awards that were voted for by the school. All in all, it was quite a cool affair, and you felt really important if you got one of the little invites (only the winners, their parents, and one invited friend each got to go).

The academic awards were quite different, and held in the October, I think. Everyone who took GCSEs were invited to go back to collect their certificates, but hardly anyone below the top two sets went. There were a couple of prizes for every year for achievement, and the top ten out of the past year 11 got prizes too. It was interesting, especially if there was a good guest speaker, but it was seen to be much less important than the sports awards.

#38:  Author: Loryat PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2006 5:18 pm
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My school had barely any sports awards. You could get an award for PE or there a bunch of special achievement awards. Bringing in more sports awards might have been a good idea, since my school was also very academically weak (though not as bad as yours by the sound of it).

#39:  Author: TaraLocation: Malvern, Worcestershire PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2006 9:59 pm
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Lesley wrote:
Because she never bothered working and was always far more interested in boys than homework it was assumed by everyone that she stopped me.

Yes, I had one of those, too, and the staff were astounded and aggrieved when my results didn't plummet at the end of the year. My rebel friend also gave me most of the fun in my life - and ended up as a very good and very dedicated teacher! Shocked And we're still friends forty years on. Very Happy

My Girls' Grammar School didn't have prizegiving at all; the Comp where I worked tried very hard to make it fair and inclusive, but it's really hard to get it right.

We always had pupils giving reports on school activities, and I remember one year when a profoundly deaf student (we had a large Hearing Impaired section) gave the report for the Orienteering Club. His speech was non-existent, so a hearing friend interpreted for him, and it was so moving. My school was pretty marvellous, really.
*Misses it* Sad

#40:  Author: LesleyLocation: Allhallows, Kent PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2006 11:14 pm
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((((((Judith))))))

Just think on all the things you achieved while there, Judith, be proud of your victories. Smile

#41:  Author: CatyLocation: New Zealand PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2006 11:42 pm
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We never had form lists. We got 2 reports a year after Christmas & Summer Exams and these gave a mark & a short comment for each subject. They introduced School Awards in my last 2 years, but these consisted of: Best Leaving & Junior Cert Exam Results, Student of the Year for each year & an overall student of the year and sportsperson of the year. The students of the year were never picked for academic ability, more to do with their attitude.

#42:  Author: KateLocation: Ireland PostPosted: Thu Jun 08, 2006 7:51 am
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We had the same, Caty, although we didn't have a student of the year in every year. We had one for first years, one for Juniors and one for Seniors. I was runner-up student of the year for both Junior and Senior year - I'm still bitter that I never got it! I did get the best Leaving Cert prize though. Very Happy

I am a nerd.

#43:  Author: CatyLocation: New Zealand PostPosted: Fri Jun 09, 2006 1:25 am
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The year after I finished, somweone decided to sponsor the prizes, so they re-held the presentation for my final year mid-year. Except they forgot who had won & gave most of the prizes to different people!



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